Film Event 2019-02-14T17:13:14+00:00

SPOTLIGHT ON THE ARCHIVE: Film and Psychoanalysis in Focus

SPOTLIGHT ON THE ARCHIVE IS A SERIES OF EVENING SALONS THAT EXPLORE THE LINKS BETWEEN CINEMA AND PSYCHOANALYSIS. THE SCREENING SERIES HAS BEEN ORGANISED TO CELEBRATE 100 YEARS OF THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS 1920-2019.

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Reading List:

Barbera, J. Moller, H.J. (2007). Mulholland Drive (2001): A Self-Psychology Perspective. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 88(2):515-526.

Blothner, D. (2015). The ‘Poor Ego’s’ Adventures in Outer Space – Gravity by Alfonso Cuarön. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 96(1):211-223.

Cartwright, D. (2005). β-Mentality in The matrix trilogy. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 86(1):179-190.

Civitarese, G. (2010). Do Cyborgs Dream? Post-Human Landscapes in Shinya Tsukamoto’s Nightmare Detective (2006). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 91(4):1005-1016.

Knafo, D. Feiner, K. (2002). Film Review Essay Blue Velvet: David Lynch’s Primal Scene. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 83(6):1445-1451.

Lombardi, R. Pola, M. (2010). The Body, Adolescence, and Psychosis. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 91(6):1419-1444.

Margulies, A. (2016). Avatars of Desire and the Question of Presence: Virtual and Transitional Spaces Meet Their Liminal Edge – from Pygmalion to Spike Jonze’s Her, and Beyond…. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 97(6):1697-1708.

Meiri, S. Kohen-Raz, O. (2017). Mainstream Body-Character Breach Films and Subjectivization. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 98(1):201-217.

Ozon, F. Schiller, B. (2005). On the threshold of the creative imagination: Swimming Pool (2003). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 86(2):557-566.

Storck, T. (2016). Why Drive? Psychoanalytic Reflections on the Film Never Let Me Go. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 97(1):187-201.

Tubert-Oklander, J. (1988). Technical Aspects of the Analysis of an Adolescent Boy. Int. R. Psycho-Anal., 15:207-224.

Poscheschnik, G. (2018). Game of Thrones—A psychoanalytic interpretation including some remarks on the psychosocial function of modern TV series. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 99(4):1004-1016.

FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION

Chair: Caroline Edwards

Speakers: David Morgan, Alexander Sergeant

Psychoanalysis concerns itself with aspects of experience and identity that often remain unsaid, grappling as it does with the mechanics of bringing the unspeakable to light. Fantasy is a central concept here, working to express desires and fears in equal measure. Cinema has long been fascinated by stories that resonate with uncanny figments of the imagination, and its play with dimensions of the supernatural, and many of the most lucrative box office hits belong to the genres of the fantastic and science fiction. In this salon, our speakers will explore the metaphors and experiences of these genres. David Morgan will ask how films such as Ex Machina and Blade Runner place our fears about artificial intelligence front and centre, resonating with the work of Herbert Marcuse in One Dimensional Man. Alexander Sergeant will explore how The Wizard of Oz and its play with the fantastic allow us to embrace the illusory nature of experience and to enhance the pleasures of cinema so that it better resembles an object of childhood play.

TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED HERE

Please find below an open access list of selected papers about psychoanalysis and film.

Meet the Chair & Speakers

Caroline Edwards
Dr Caroline Edwards is Senior Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature at Birkbeck, University of London. She is author of Utopia and the Contemporary British Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2019), co-editor of China Miéville: Critical Essays (Gylphi, 2015) and Maggie Gee: Critical Essays (Gylphi, 2015), and a Founding Director of the Open Library of Humanities. Her work has appeared in Telos, Modern Fiction Studies, Textual Practice, Contemporary Literature, ASAP/Journal, Subjectivity, New Statesman and the Times Higher Education. She is currently working on a book about science fiction and extreme environments.
David Morgan
David Morgan is a consultant psychotherapist and psychoanalyst NHS and private practice. Training analyst/therapist and supervisor for the British Psychoanalytic Association and British Psychotherapy Foundation, and a Fellow of the British Psychoanalytical Society. He is Director of (PiP) Public interest Psychology.
He provides consultation to the public and private sector, including organisations of a political and social nature, and is a regular speaker at conferences. He enjoys lecturing and teaching and has contributed to radio programmes.
He has recently published in the New Internationalist. He was co-editor with Stan Ruszczynski of Lectures on Violence, Perversion, and Delinquency (Karnac, 2007). He has two edited books in press ‘The Political Mind. The unconscious in political and social life’ and ‘ A Deeper Cut. The Political Mind 2’
Alexander Sergeant
Dr. Alexander Sergeant is a Lecturer in Film and Media Theory at Bournemouth University. His research examines the historical and theoretical depths of popular fantasy filmmaking, a subject he has published on widely in a range of academic journals and edited collection. His monograph, The Fantastic in Hollywood Fantasy Cinema, based on tonight’s talk will be published in Spring 2020. He is the co-founder of fantasy-animation.org, a website dedicated to the exploring the relationship between fantasy cinema and the medium of animation through weekly blog posts by academics, writers, animators, fans and critics. He is also the co-host of the Fantasy/Animation podcast, where he applies his research to a range of animated fantasy media from Who Framed Roger Rabbit to The Greatest Showman.